Magazine article Marketing

C4 Salary Scale That Won't Quite Make the Grade

Magazine article Marketing

C4 Salary Scale That Won't Quite Make the Grade

Article excerpt

People are endlessly fascinated by how much others earn. The `highest paid director' section is the most avidly read page on any company's annual report and Cedric Brown of British Gas has joined the ranks of the immortals, courtesy of the pig named after him which was paraded at the company's annual meeting.

Yet there is no logic at all in what is perceived as a fair salary. Brown was paid a pittance compared with the money middle-ranking merchant bankers hand each other. And few, at least in Manchester, will begrudge Eric Cantona his millions.

Yet there was outrage when it was disclosed that John Birt has been given a `massive' pay rise which took his salary to around 200,000 [pounds sterling] -- although the taxation arrangements added something to the excitement. The line that separates the generous but reasonable from the outrageous and greedy is a fine one. It is a question of degree and the proportions are set, partly at least, by the nature of the organisation.

What then to make of the I news that Michael Grade's total emoluments added up to more than 600,000 [pounds sterling] last year? The sum was far more than double the payments made to the BBC director general and not all that far off the sum picked up by Michael Green, who runs a FT-SE 100 company capitalised at more than 2.7bn [pounds sterling]. No one could possibly call Michael Grade greedy. After all, he once gave up a broadcasting career in American and $500,000 a year to become controller of BBC 1 on starvation rations at 40,000 [pounds sterling] a year. …

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