Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Metformin Decreases Food Intake, Perceived Hunger

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Metformin Decreases Food Intake, Perceived Hunger

Article excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO -- Metformin appears to exert its weight-loss effects in obese children by reducing their desire to eat and thus decreasing their food intake.

A substudy of a government-sponsored placebo-controlled trial found that children taking metformin not only ate less, they reported higher satiety and lower hunger than those taking placebo, Rachael Sorg said in a poster session at the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society.

The 6-month study, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, randomized 100 obese children with severe hyperinsulinemia (mean age 10 years) to either 1,000 mg metformin twice a day or to placebo. Some of the children (45 metformin-treated and 39 placebo-treated) participated in pre- and posttreatment meal studies to evaluate the drug's effect on food intake. One study was conducted before the drug trial commenced and one at the end of the 6-month treatment period.

Each meal study included two buffet lunches, each containing 28 items (9,835 calories total). The first lunch was consumed after children fasted through the night. The second was consumed after they drank a 790-calorie nutrient shake for breakfast. …

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