Magazine article Nation's Cities Weekly

Five Years of Development Pays Off

Magazine article Nation's Cities Weekly

Five Years of Development Pays Off

Article excerpt

What began as an Ada version of the state's "Don't Lay that Trash on Oklahoma" program has grown to a full-fledged award-winning beautification project for the community of 15,820.

The cost-savings program which can only improve the community's standing in the economic development race was recognized by the Oklahoma Department of Transportation during the 1995 Keep Oklahoma Beautiful Awards Banquet.

Since 1990 Ada officials have been expanding what started out as a litter abatement program, explained Ada City Manager John Pape. "Over the years we've continued to add new components which add up to the community-wide beautification program," he said. After first holding a local version of the "Don't Lay that Trash on Oklahoma" campaign, Ada officials first added the "Adopt a Spot" project to the program. It works by assigning stretches of road, a park or other area to local clubs, groups and organizations who volunteer to participate. Posted signs announce the "adoption" to the community - providing recognition for the groups as well as motivation for others to become involved.

The next component to be added was the local coordination with the state's "Trash Off Day." The city had always held a spring cleanup week, where citizens were encouraged to do their part in making sure trash and debris made its way to the landfill. Trash Off Day takes the program one step further by expanding the clean-up effort to include hundreds of volunteers picking up hundreds of bags worth of litter throughout the community. In Ada alone 342 bags and 163 truck loads of trash were picked up by some 216 volunteers during its debut on April 8, 1995.

Landscaping projects mark another component of the Ada program. First the city opened and began operating a green house. "We have a crew which is responsible for public landscaping and the greenhouse means that we always have seasonal foliage and other plants on hand," the city manager said. …

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