Magazine article Editor & Publisher

TRAILMIX for Wednesday: Obama, McCain and a Gaffe Riot

Magazine article Editor & Publisher

TRAILMIX for Wednesday: Obama, McCain and a Gaffe Riot

Article excerpt

In today's review of newspaper campaign blogs: President Bush does and then doesn't comment on America's financial turmoil, John McCain invents the BlackBerry, and is judged on his health care plan. Palin to sharpen foreign policy skills at the United Nations. President decides not to comment on country's financial deteriorationThe SwampThe Chicago TribuneBy Mark Silva After first assuring the press pool that he would have a comment for them once he'd met with his Working Group on Financial Markets yesterday, the President was a no show. President Bush sent White House Press Secretary Dana Perino out to the waiting press in the West Wing after the closed door session to say, that "The President was briefed this afternoon by his working group on financial markets. He appreciates their work to strengthen and stabilize the markets." As Mark Silva said, "Must have been a lot of good news in there." * Al Gore invented the Internet and all John McCain did was invent the BlackBerry

When McCain's domestic policy advisor Douglas Holtz-Eakin was asked about his candidate's grasp of high tech matters, he held up his BlackBerry and referred to McCain's tenure as head of the Senate Commerce Committee. "He did this," Holtz-Eakin continued, "telecommunications in the US comes through the Commerce Committee and it is the miracle that John McCain helped create. And that's what he did. " As Mark Silva pointed out in the world of politics only one sentence leaped to mind: "Al Gore invented the internet." Silva's posting also includes the "guarded retreat" from the McCain camp regarding the Holtz-Eakin comment, so I gather McCain doesn't want Gore tag this time regarding the BlackBerry.

Douglas J. Holtz-Eakin making news for McCain againThe CaucusThe New York TimesBy Kevin Sack As noted in the BlackBerry blurb, Senator John McCain's top domestic policy advisor, Douglas J. Holtz-Eakin is stirring up controversy again. Holtz-Eakin, former Congressional Budget Office director, said in a conference call with reporters that Mr. McCain's health care proposal would "put 25 to 30 million individuals out of the ranks of the uninsured, into the ranks of the insured." If true this would be quite an achievement since the ranks of the country's uninsured is now estimated to be approximately 47 million. The only problem is that in an article published Tuesday in the journal Health Affairs, a panel of prominent health economists concludes that Mr. …

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