Magazine article Dance Magazine

Pilobolus

Magazine article Dance Magazine

Pilobolus

Article excerpt

REVIEWED BY MOLLY MCQUADE

Imagery is like an alphabet, susceptible to endless rearrangement of small parts in the creation of a moving picture. All dances are concerned somehow or other with imagery, yet not all troupes seem to be searching for it with zest. Pilobolus nearly always does. In the twenty-five years of the company's life, Pilobolus has rearranged the alphabet of danced imagery many and curious times. Its quarter-century-anniversary season at the Joyce continued that quest.

The season saw a revival of the company's very first piece, Pilobolus 11971), and the debut of a new dance, Aeros. For people who weren't around to observe Pilobolus's beginnings at Dartmouth College in a dance class taught by Alison Chase, currently coartistic director, the revival may have come as a surprise. This collaborative troupe's signature is inventively acrobatic play, and yet Pilobolus, where it all got started, is a relatively static dance for four men (Kent Lindemer, Mark Santillano, John-Mario Sevilla, and Darryl Thomasl who build a series of images with their bodies based on linked balances. It almost seems as if the men are trying to avoid action, and trying to avoid dancing. Instead' the stillness of the images they create is all-important. The process of image-building is so phlegmatic as to seem oddly out of character. The funny little fungus that gave the company and this particular piece their enduring names is not smiling or even squirming in Pilobolus. …

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