Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Second York Daily on George Street: Like Its Competitor's before It, Daily Record's Newsroom Moves Back to Town

Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Second York Daily on George Street: Like Its Competitor's before It, Daily Record's Newsroom Moves Back to Town

Article excerpt

IN WHAT AT first seems like a step back, the York (Pa.) Daily Record took a step forward earlier this year when it moved its editorial offices back to the town's historic district from an industrial park four miles away.

The move "exceeded my expectations," Record editor and publisher Dennis R. Hetzel remarked last month in his sunlit office. "We have an office with windows."

To appreciate his comment, one just has to look at the paper's former home, an industrial building in Springettsbury Township that is more suited to its current occupant, Penn-Air & Hydraulics.

And the move was a "tolerable business decision," according to Hetzel, who arrived at the paper six years ago. The building at 1750 Industrial Highway was sold to Penn-Air & Hydraulics, and the new offices in town are leased for 10 years.

The first-floor newsroom and offices of the Daily Record are behind a facade comprising what were once the fronts of five 19th century buildings. The doorway to the one at 122 S. George Street leads to a three-story atrium; from there, another door gives entry to a modern, one-story office space.

Hetzel said some of the buildings that make up the facade had enough historical significance to make the Historic Architecture Review Board unlikely to approve demolition.

Retaining the facades added to the cost of the three-story office building, in which the Record is a prime tenant, Hetzel said, noting that the facades seemed to be in a very precarious state during construction last winter.

He said the move was made possible by Robert Pullo, CEO of York Financial, owner of the property. He was the one who pulled it all together, getting municipal approvals and state money for the preservation of the facade.

The most obvious advantage for the staff, Hetzel said, is that it is now "closer to the news makers." There are more options for lunch, he added, although not as many for those who work the night shifts.

Michael Newsome, the newspaper's controller, said, "We have the most secure and convenient parking in all of downtown York." This is in a fenced area just behind the building.

Newsome said the move was a challenge for the staff, because it meant moving existing equipment into the new site in nine hours without missing an edition of the newspaper. …

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