Magazine article Dance Magazine

Stuttgart Ballet

Magazine article Dance Magazine

Stuttgart Ballet

Article excerpt

Within the first hundred days of his newly established Stuttgart reign, Reid Anderson had (a) threatened to resign because of budget cuts (which is why he had resigned as artistic director of the National Ballet of Canada); (b) been appointed Intendant of Stuttgart Ballet, a position that combines the roles of general manager and artistic director (only John Neumeier in Hamburg and William Forsythe in Frankfurt enjoy the same status in Germany); and (c) presented three highly acclaimed productions.

The first was a revival of John Cranko's Romeo and Juliet, the company's signature ballet. The second was a quadruple bill consisting of revised productions of Les Sylphides, Cranko's Opus 1, and Glen Tetley's Voluntaries, plus the premiere of Uwe Scholz's Notations I-IV, a stunning solo for Vladimir Malakhov, who was afterward branded spectre du nucleaire.

In between, having withdrawn--after complicated negotiations--his threatened resignation, Anderson offered his first all-new program on December 5. This started with an excellent production of Balanchine's The Four Temperaments, staged by Joysanne Sidimus. It was performed in meticulous fashion, with Krzysztof Nowagrodzki leading "Melancholic," Sue Jin Kang and Roland Vogel "Sanguinic," the brilliant Robert Tewsley "Phelgmatic," and Julia Kramer "Choleric." The successful result was the more astonishing as the company has little to no experience with Balanchine (former chief Marcia Haydee never pretended to have any sympathies for Mr. …

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