Magazine article Teacher Librarian

The TL Professional Development Challenge and Model Building Contest Results: Graphical Representations of the AASL Learning Standards, 2007

Magazine article Teacher Librarian

The TL Professional Development Challenge and Model Building Contest Results: Graphical Representations of the AASL Learning Standards, 2007

Article excerpt

WHEN THE AASL LEARNING STANDARDS FOR THE 21ST-CENTURY LEARNER WERE ISSUED IN NOVEMBER, 2007, IT BECAME APPARENT THE COMPLEXITY OF THE STANDARDS WOULD REQUIRE BOTH STUDY AND INTERNALIZATION BY MEMBERS OF THE SCHOOL LIBRARY PROFESSION.

So, TL issued a challenge to our readers to design a graphical representation of the standards and promised to award five $100 prizes (see contest rules at www.teacherlibrarian.com/tltoolkit/development.html). We received 37 entries, some from the point of view of an adult using the standards, and others from the point of view of the learner trying to understand what is expected of them. Thanks to our judges Betty Marcoux (TL coeditor), Doug Johnson and Barbara Weathers (TL board members), as well as Aria Tatelman, Middle School Librarian, Duchesne Academy in Houston, TX, and Jean Pfluger, Lower School Librarian, Duchesne Academy, for taking the time and effort.

TL came up with this contest because we join those in the field that believe when any professional or learner is faced with a major concept, busy with content and implications for practice, it is a great learning activity both for professionals and for learners to attempt to visualize, through a model, a mind map, or other graphic, the meaning of the major ideas at hand. Such a task requires us all to use both parts of our brain. We hoped we would find many out there to accept the challenge.

For all of us who teach information literacy and topical content, visualization is a great way to assess the deep understanding of what is known, what is misinterpreted, and what just goes in one ear and out the other. As we seek to teach using the new standards, assess progress, and advocate for our contribution to teaching and learning, we need to teach, clarify, evaluate, redesign, and teach again until we can trace the path of ideas and concepts in the minds of learners we encounter. …

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