Magazine article Guitar Player

Old Dog X-Cab

Magazine article Guitar Player

Old Dog X-Cab

Article excerpt

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

WHEN I JOINED GUITAR PLAYER IN 1998, I WASN'T a wannabe rock star anymore. I became an editor and a part-time musician. The toadies were long gone, so as my rig had to fit in my car, I said goodbye to my beloved half-stacks and switched to small combo amps. Now, as I wasn't huffing and puffing away my last scraps of dignity while humping gear into seedy clubs, I was content.

But then, GP Associate Editor Jude Gold ruined everything by playing me a rehearsal tape he made while testing the Marshall Vintage Modern half-stack. What a roar! The creamy overdrive, punch, and airy dimension brought me back to the days when my back-line was a revved-up phalanx of heads and cabs. I knew right then my combo days were numbered.

A further persuasion occurred when I stumbled across the Old Dog X-Cab ($1,799 retail/ $1,439 street) at Winter NAMM 2008. The 4x12 cabinet is quite an eye-catcher (Old Dog president Bob Stevens says, "I never knew how many bands had an 'X' in their name until I made this thing"). It's constructed entirely from Baltic birch, and loaded with four Celestion Vintage 30s--each cone modded with a foam diffuser to reduce audible hiss and abrasive mids. Anxious to renew my bond with half-stack snarl, I paired the X-Cab with Marshall's JVM 210H (we reviewed the 410H in the Feb '08 issue), plugged in an Epiphone Elitist Country Deluxe and a Collings 290, and rolled the 100 lb. cab to a series of shows with the Trouble with Monkeys (punk pop) and O1' Cheeky Bastards (Celtic-flavored folk rock). …

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