Magazine article Journal of Property Management

You Be the Judge: Use Self-Judgment Constructively and You'll Be Better for It

Magazine article Journal of Property Management

You Be the Judge: Use Self-Judgment Constructively and You'll Be Better for It

Article excerpt

I'M JUDGMENTAL. SURE, I TELL MYSELF I'M NOT. BUT I JUDGE CONSTANTLY. To assuage my guilt, I consider my judgment warranted. In what do I sit in judgment? Me.

My disclosure is also tempered because I know I am not alone. People who are reflective often judge themselves numerous times a day. Was that the right decision? Did I word that the right way? This internal analysis results in a steady stream of self-judgment.

THE GOOD

There are those who sit in judgment of themselves and believe every decision they make is a good one. Delusions of grandeur keep us from the motivation to change, but to remain competitive, change must occur.

I call it the "success trap." It is dangerous to think that all the positives that brought you success will keep you on that path. As Marshall Goldsmith, an executive coach and author of, What Got You Here Won't Get You There, said, "The 'good news' is that these positive memories build our self-confidence and inspire us to try to succeed even more. The 'bad news' is our delusional self-image can make it very hard to hear negative feedback and admit that we need to change."

THE BAD

Some individuals find fault with too many decisions they make and actions they take; they are exceptionally self-critical--always second-guessing themselves. The result is paralysis in energy, risk-taking, decision-making and thus, in succeeding. The more self-critical you are, the more you push success away.

Use cognitive therapy to challenge your thinking and change the self-talk you repeat. …

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