Magazine article The Fader

CMYK Overload

Magazine article The Fader

CMYK Overload

Article excerpt

[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED]

From 1980-2000, Chris Lane and John MacGillivray ran Fashion Records, a UK label that released reggae, dancehall, ragga and jungle. Throughout that time they saw the advent of new technologies and watched as their album artwork evolved with widening graphic possibilities. Though Lane and MacGillivray themselves never designed any of the art, they acted as curators and formed a slick, inimitable style for their records, a rainbow palette of colors streaming across sometimes gaudy but always charming photos of their artists. Lane explains their methods.

When I started buying albums from Jamaica, the artwork on them was totally different from any English or American pop or rock or soul album. It had its own style, these very garish colors, and we wanted to emulate that but at the same time have our own identity. If you were into reggae in England in the late '60s and quite early into the '70s, you had no idea what your favorite artist looked like. The sleeves didn't have pictures of the artists. We tried to capture some of the spontaneity and vibe of the Jamaican artwork, but make it look a bit more professional. We were informed by the things that we grew up with, our love of reggae from when we were kids, and we just wanted to follow that tradition, but improve it if we could. A lot of those Jamaican albums really did look just so cheap and nasty that we used to say, Somebody's album's got really good music on it but unless you are already into it, you'd never buy an album that looked like that. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.