Magazine article Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management

CSO Magazine: The Grand Neal Winner: A Special Report on the Global Impact of a Local Problem Earns CSO the Grand Neal Award

Magazine article Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management

CSO Magazine: The Grand Neal Winner: A Special Report on the Global Impact of a Local Problem Earns CSO the Grand Neal Award

Article excerpt

DEREK SLATER, editor-in-chief of CSO, accepted the prestigious 2008 Grand Neal for "Red Gold Rush," a special report on the global impact of semi-precious metal theft that was published in the February 2007 issue of the magazine.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"What made this article particularly extraordinary, of course, was the writer," says Slater. "Local news outlets have given lots of coverage to various forms of metal theft, because it seems like a local problem. And it is. [Executive editor] Scott Berinato picked up on the fact that semi-precious metal theft seemed to be running rampant and, through a lot of diligent reporting and his own insight, connected dots that--to the best of my knowledge--hadn't been connected before in the media."

As a result, Berinato delivered a story that not only was an interesting read but was something of great value to CSO's core audience: The chief security officers of the world. He presented the macro economic trends behind semi-precious metal theft and explained why the problem was not going to go away. In fact, it very likely will get worse. Security officers, therefore, must stop hoping metal theft will be less of an issue and start thinking much more proactively about how to lock down these valuable materials.

"This article served as a validation of things that some chief security officers had begun to believe were true," says Slater. "The advantage to the reporter, of course, was that he could contact a number of people in different locales over the course of time and confirm the trend. Then he could dig backwards and uncover some of the causes."

In this case, one of the causes was the building boom, particularly in China, which has created such demand for semi-precious metals and building materials that the price of these commodities has gone through the roof. So because copper, for example, has become so valuable, the theft of copper has gone up dramatically--even in local communities in the United States. …

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