Magazine article Marketing

Why a Quick-Fix Policy Can Give Firms the Blues

Magazine article Marketing

Why a Quick-Fix Policy Can Give Firms the Blues

Article excerpt

A friend just wrote suggesting these pages are "preoccupied with half-wits blowing lots of other people's money, getting fired and turning up to do it all over again somewhere else. I've now concluded, with some sadness, that marketing has ousted architecture from the bottom of the professional competence table."

This is unfair to our newshounds, who after all can only report the facts, and ignores the claims of social workers, economists and teachers. Surely we can't be as culpable as many of them? At least we don't destroy families, cripple entire national economies, or render whole generations illiterate and morally derelict. Indeed, we even make up for the latter by taking nigh-unemployable graduates off the streets to write impenetrable, jargon-clotted research documents and marketing plans which, luckily for them, no-one reads.

Some professions' sins find them out more surely than others. Who remembers the names of the hordes of economists who wrote to Margaret Thatcher saying she was wrong in what she was doing with the economy? Did any lose their jobs as a result? How many 'caring workers' are clapped in jail for the misery they inflict on families? But each disgusting building architects design testifies, until it falls down or is demolished, to their bad taste and incompetence. For us, each sight of the sales graph does much the same.

It takes longer, though, for Sir James Stirling to design a masterpiece than it does to reposition a soft drink; and longer still for anyone to notice the roof leaks, by which time another dumb committee has coughed up for something else on the other side of the world. …

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