Magazine article Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management

Web Design Dos and Don'ts

Magazine article Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management

Web Design Dos and Don'ts

Article excerpt

Just when you thought it was safe to launch a Web site, out comes another old-fashioned, ink-on-paper guide to help you stay afloat in these choppy online waters. Esteemed magazine and Web design guru Roger Black--whose credits are too long to scroll through (Esquire, Premiere, SmartMoney, www.msnbc.com and www.parentsoup.com, just for starters)--merges the worlds of print publishing and the Internet in Web Sites That Work ($45, Adobe Press, 1997). If the first few years of Web publishing were characterized by reckless abandon and the freedom of this new medium, the past year has highlighted the need for some online dos and don'ts. Some of Black's: Don't use big, slow graphics. Don't letterspace lowercase. Don't put a lot of text in all caps. Do put content on every page. Do make everything as big as possible.

Black spoke to Folio: about the synergies between print and the Internet and why he feels the Web will usher in a "golden age of magazines."--Jennifer Sucov

What is the biggest lesson in site design that you've learned so far? Don't offer too much all at once. When you look at [Time Warner's] Pathfinder (www.pathfinder.com), it's a little bewildering. There's not much content until you drill down a few levels. In magazines, we've learned to bring content to the surface and evoke a mood. You wouldn't put 50 coverlines on a magazine, would you?

What is missing on the Web? People and celebrities. We know that celebrities sell newsstand copies, but if you look at the Internet there aren't many pictures of people. …

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