Magazine article Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management

A Meeting of the Minds: Regional Publishing Conferences Are Worth Attending for Everyone, No Matter What Your Magazine Covers

Magazine article Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management

A Meeting of the Minds: Regional Publishing Conferences Are Worth Attending for Everyone, No Matter What Your Magazine Covers

Article excerpt

Regional publishing conferences are worth attending for everyone, no matter what your magazine covers.

As a more or less regular attendee of seminars and conferences for magazine publishers and editors, I can't help but notice the high number of my peers who don't show up. I've concluded that we in the communications industry don't do a very good job of communicating with one another--at least about the value of these meetings. Many of you, I am sure, would attend these conferences if you had more information about them.

The conference brochures, unfortunately, don't always present enough data to convince budget-strapped editors and publishers that it's worthwhile to invest both time and money. Of course, it's always possible that some editors simply believe their books are unique and thus, that the problems they face are unique--not the stuff of conference fare. And perhaps some publishers are smug to the point of believing that going somewhere to learn how to improve their rifles would be a waste of rime. Both viewpoints are wrong, in my opinion, and in an attempt to entice some no-shows into attending and learning the same for themselves, here's a review of yet another conference I attended recently.

The folks at the Magazine Association of Georgia asked if I would give the keynote address at their annual conference. I was fortunate to be able to attend a sampling of the main components of the conference and found the quality consistently high. The break-out sessions were small enough to allow for discussion. "Automating your sales force," "Surfing for sources," "Magazine cover design" and "Paper economics" were just a few of the topics covered. And publishers of smaller magazines forced to do it all themselves were able to jump between sessions. These sessions gave editors, circulation managers and ad sales reps the opportunity to sharpen their skills and network with colleagues.

In a daring move, the association asked me to emcee "The MAG Forum." The format was left open, with only one determining factor in place--that all the conference attendees would be gathered in one room and encouraged to say whatever was on their minds. When I asked for some topic guidance from the conference sponsors, they said, "Think Oprah." So in one hour, we covered a host of topics that prompted some emotional responses from the attendees. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.