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Strikers Lose Round in Court: Detroit Strikers Lose Case Aimed at Securing Quick Return to Jobs

Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Strikers Lose Round in Court: Detroit Strikers Lose Case Aimed at Securing Quick Return to Jobs

Article excerpt

Detroit strikers lose case aimed at securing quick return to jobs

A FEDERAL JUDGE'S Aug. 14 ruling ensures there will be no quick return to work for the great majority of the 2,500 Detroit daily newspaper employees who walked off their jobs more than two years ago.

U.S. Circuit Court Judge John Corbett O'Meara refused the National labor Relations Board's request for a so-called 10(j) injunction that would have forced the Detroit Free Press, Detroit News and their joint operating agency, Detroit Newspapers, to take back well over 1,000 workers from six unions that struck July 13, 1995.

The strikers, who on Valentine's Day offered unconditionally to return to work, have pinned their hopes on getting a federal back-to-work order. During the bitter strike, Knight-Ridder Inc's Free Press and Gannett Co.'s News, lost about a third of their combined circulation and considerable advertising revenue. But the jointly operated papers are now profitable, and published every day during the strike.

Strikers' spirits were buoyed earlier in the summer first when an administrative law judge ruled that the strike was caused by management's unfair labor practices and again when NLRB headquarters in Washington, D.C., authorized its Detroit office to enforce a back-to-work order with a 10(j) injunction.

That order would have meant a massive upheaval in the papers' newsrooms and joint production and circulation operation, where most workers are replacements or employees who crossed picket lines. …

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