Magazine article Artforum International

"Zones of Conflict": Pratt Manhattan Gallery

Magazine article Artforum International

"Zones of Conflict": Pratt Manhattan Gallery

Article excerpt

Debates and discussions around the profoundly contradictory, and often uncomfortable, interrelationships of art, aesthetics, and politics have been in motion for decades. Numerous exhibitions, panel discussions, and other events have been organized to address these worthy issues, yet we remain, after two decades of increased networks of globalized artistic exchange, unable to effectively trace the social reverberations. Such uncertainty seemed to be the undercurrent of "Zones of Conflict," a modest group exhibition intermixing documentary, postdocumentary, and hybrid docu-fictive photographic and video-based practices that confront, testify to, register, and de-realize actual territories of war.

In his absorbing, theoretically savvy, yet ultimately unsurprising essay accompanying the show, curator T. J. Demos, a contemporary art historian and critic, writes of the urgency to examine "recent artistic approaches to geopolitical conflict" within the context of the endless "war on terror." Invoking Paul Virilio, Demos reminds us that this has been a war of images and representation; in other words, of propaganda. He contends that the artists gathered here resist the conventional language of mainstream media as they articulate notions of truth (vis-a-vis representation) and, further, that their practices generate a kind of fecund uncertainty about the relations among aesthetics, expression, and "the political" that contests typical notions of effectiveness. Deploying the ideas of Jacques Ranciere, who argues that aesthetics, and by extension art, still has the potential to rearticulate the terms of political discourse to generate a condition of equality, as well as Michel Foucault's deconstruction of notions of universal truth vis-a-vis those of subjectivity and power, Demos basically claims that the practices offered open up the potential for critical consciousness.

Among the evidence was the historically inscrutable quasi documentation of The Atlas Group in Collaboration with Walid Raad's Let's be honest, the weather helped (Saudi Arabia, China, US, Switzerland, NATO, UK, Israel), 1984-2007, a book of black-and-white images of what appear to be various urban sites, colored with Baldessari-like dots corresponding to the types of ammunition used in the Lebanese Civil War. …

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