Magazine article The Wilson Quarterly

A Leg Up from the Job Corps

Magazine article The Wilson Quarterly

A Leg Up from the Job Corps

Article excerpt

THE SOURCE: "Does Job Corps Work? Impact Findings From the National Job Corps Study" by Peter Z. Schochet, John Burghardt, and Sheena McConnell, in American Economic Review, Dec. 2008.

THE JOB CORPS, A LEGACY OF the Great Society, has been under attack from one direction or another throughout most of its 45 years. But now the results are in: It's effective. It gives low-income workers about a year of extra schooling, counseling, and vocational training in one of 75 different trades. Its participants are less commonly arrested and locked up in prison, and the great majority who haven't graduated from high school are nearly twice as likely to earn an equivalency degree. They also earn more money than non-participants. Unfortunately, the effect on the incomes of younger Job Corps graduates is curiously short-lived.

The Job Corps is the only large-scale training program that has been shown to increase earnings for down-and-out youth, write Peter Z. Schochet, John Burghardt, and Sheena McConnell, researchers with Mathematica Policy Research in Princeton, New Jersey. Designed for young people ages 16 to 24 who receive welfare or food stamps or have very low incomes, and who live in an "environment characterized by a disruptive home life, high crime rates, or limited job opportunities; the corps is the nation's largest job-training program, with about 60,000 new participants every year. Nearly 90 percent of those enrolled live in residential Job Corps centers, so it's also expensive, at $16,500 per trainee. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.