Magazine article Information Today

Exemplar: What's in a Word?

Magazine article Information Today

Exemplar: What's in a Word?

Article excerpt

The word "exemplar" means "one that serves as a model or example ... an ideal model ..." according to Merriam-Webster Online. And Exemplar, Springer Science+Business Media's free linguistic tool, may be just that.

Springer Exemplar, which is accessible to anyone connected to the internet, lets researchers see how a specific term or phrase is being used in peer-reviewed published literature. Springer teamed up with the Centre for Biomedical and Health Linguistics last November to develop this tool that taps directly into Springer's published content.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"The Centre for Biomedical and Health Linguistics noticed the inconsistent use of language, which was causing barriers to education on a global basis," says Brian Bishop, director of eproduct development and innovation at Springer. Exemplar, which is in beta, was introduced to reduce the confusion about terminology, says Bishop. He adds that the site was kept as simple as possible, so researchers could find results quickly and wouldn't have to dig deeper. "We see how the term is being used in context with the exact phrase match in the text," he says. "Midwivery is one example where there can be local distinctions in terms for the same thing." Exemplar takes the guesswork out of the process.

For example, users can plug in a specific search term into the search box, or they can type in a specific subject or journal. When a researcher searches for a term, the results are displayed with the keyword highlighted along with a few words before and after the key term so the results are in context. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.