Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

Settlers or Squatters? the Politics of Demolition and Construction in East Jerusalem Have Always Been Fraught. Now Israeli Settlers Are Using Archaeological Excavation as Cover for a Programme of Expansion and Dispossession-But the Inhabitants of One Palestinian Village Won't Go Quietly

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

Settlers or Squatters? the Politics of Demolition and Construction in East Jerusalem Have Always Been Fraught. Now Israeli Settlers Are Using Archaeological Excavation as Cover for a Programme of Expansion and Dispossession-But the Inhabitants of One Palestinian Village Won't Go Quietly

Article excerpt

On a bright, sunny morning in early December, I stood on the stone ramparts of the Beit Hatzofeh lookout tower in the heart of the tourist attraction that calls itself the "City of David", and counted off the touchstones of the three great monotheistic religions: the dome of al-Aqsa Mosque on the Temple Mount, or Haram al-Sharif, rose above the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem, 100 metres to the north; the Western Wall--the holiest shrine in Judaism, "where the divine presence always rests"--lay hidden beneath it, no more than five minutes' walk away. To the east, the Valley of Jehosophat, where, it is said, humanity will assemble on the Day of Judgement, ran past the Jewish cemetery on the Mount of Olives towards the location of the Garden of Gethsemane and the tomb of the Virgin Mary.

Despite these overlapping spiritual topographies, no one disputes ownership of the Temple Mount--save for a small minority of Jewish fanatics who would like to demolish the Dome of the Rock and al-Aqsa Mosque and rebuild Solomon's Temple in their place. But what is disputed, as the Israeli flags fluttering in the breeze around Beit Hatzofeh confirm, is ownership of the Palestinian village of Silwan, which pours down the hillside below the southern walls of the Old City and rises again on the far side of the biblical Valley of Kidron.

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Silwan lies in the heart of Arab East Jerusalem. It is home to approximately 40,000 Palestinians, and 300 Jews, who exert a disproportionate influence on life in the village. Their activities are co-ordinated by a group called El-Ad--an acronym derived from the Hebrew phrase for "to the City of David". Far from operating on the fringes of the law, like many of the organisations that establish outposts in the West Bank, it enjoys the backing of several institutions of the Israeli state. And since 2002, it has controlled Silwan's most important asset: the archaeological site it calls the City of David.

Biblical chronology suggests that King David--the first ruler of the united kingdom of Israel--conquered Jerusalem in 1000BC and made it his capital. Though most reputable authorities regard David as a folkloric figure, El-Ad takes it for granted that he lived somewhere among the stone-clad walkways and winding streets of the historic city centre. "It's the true Jerusalem: it is where David walked and Solomon walked," says Tzi Goldwag, a settler who works as a guide on the site. Goldwag believes that the City of David must remain in Israeli hands: "It's like the Western Wall--it's a symbol, a part of our history, and no normal people would give up the cradle of their history."

El-Ad also supports other settler organisations which are trying to increase the Israeli presence in Palestinian areas of inner Jerusalem, such as Sheikh Jarrah, in an attempt to encircle the Old City. Meanwhile, the Israeli ministry of housing and construction is developing three further Jewish neighbourhoods with the aim of driving a wedge between East Jerusalem and Bethlehem.

The new prime minister, Binyamin Netanyahu, and his ultra-nationalist foreign minister, Avigdor Lieberman, are also said to have agreed a plan for 3,000 homes in the area known as El, the last patch of open land between East Jerusalem and the West Bank.

In the conventional formulation, the question of what will happen to Jerusalem is a "final-status issue", to be resolved once the outline of a peace agreement has been achieved. However, groups such as El-Ad are already shaping the debate about the city's future in decisive ways: as a member of its administration told a Haaretz journalist in 2006, El-Ad wants to "create an irreversible situation in the holy basin around the Old City", excluding the possibility that it might one day become part of an independent Palestinian state. Already, its website claims that the area is now a "thriving Jewish community", as if the vast majority of its population did not exist. …

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