Magazine article The Futurist

Grrls' Revolution: Young Girls Turn to Self-Publishing for Self-Expression

Magazine article The Futurist

Grrls' Revolution: Young Girls Turn to Self-Publishing for Self-Expression

Article excerpt

Zines - the micro-publications that may be nothing but photocopies of a handwritten rant - are becoming a powerful tool for self-expression by adolescent girls (or grrls, as they call themselves).

"In the nineties, zines have exploded into an immense underground culture complete with major media coverage, zine conferences, and magazines dedicated to reviewing new zines," note Karen Green and Tristan Taormino, editors of A Girl's Guide to Taking Over the World: Writings from the Girl Zine Revolution.

Because the zines are produced by girls themselves, they tend to focus on problems of girls that are overlooked by larger, advertising-dominated media. Issues that are important to girls, such as body image, sexuality, violence, and self-expression, are showcased in writing that is unbiased (and uncensored) by commercial considerations.

"They don't have advertisers to please, and they weren't created for financial success," Green and Taormino point out. "Many of these girls and women tell us they don't do their zines for an audience necessarily. Many of them have a need to express themselves creatively and do their zines for themselves For some, when they put their work out there, the reward is finding that their friends and other girls are touched by their stories, identify with them, and are inspired to tell their stories."

And their stories are far different from those found in mainstream publications that target girls and young women. …

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