Magazine article Success

Directing a Childhood Dream: Steven Spielberg Writes His Own Script

Magazine article Success

Directing a Childhood Dream: Steven Spielberg Writes His Own Script

Article excerpt

As a Boy Scout trying to earn the photography merit badge, Steven Spielberg borrowed his dads 8 mm movie camera and made a nine-minute film called The Last Gunfight. That's how it all began for the future three-time Academy Award winner.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

A shy child, Spielberg had a vivid imagination. He created little stories as he filmed family trips, pets and friends.

His parents encouraged his interest by bringing home a projector, renting movies and showing them to neighborhood kids on summer nights. Spielberg charged 25 cents for admission, his sister sold popcorn, and they donated the money to a local charity to help children with disabilities.

At 13, he made a 40-minute war movie, Escape to Nowhere, with papier-mache sets his father helped him make. At 16, he wrote and directed a 140-minute science fiction adventure called Firelight that was shown in a local movie theater.

After applying and being rejected three times to the UCLA's School of Theater, Film and Television and USC's School of Cinematic Arts, he decided to get his own education--as an unpaid intern working three days a week in Universal Studios' editing department. …

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