Magazine article Arts & Activities

Angels in Action

Magazine article Arts & Activities

Angels in Action

Article excerpt

Introducing elements such as texture, line and shape is an important tool to teach at a young age because it provides students with fun and effective ways to make their pictures look real. Once students learn these tools of creating detail and movement, they become excited about the new tricks they have learned. Kindergarten teachers repeatedly tell me they see these elements being transferred to other drawing projects throughout the year.

We begin by looking at some simple cartoon figures that show the use of lines to create motion, texture and detail. A set of questions follow:. How did the cartoonist make something look like it was moving? What kinds of lines and shapes did the artist use to create spiky hair, curly hair, bulging eyes, grass or clouds? Almost all the students usually have their hands raised. I discuss the importance of the placement of action lines to show the direction of movement.

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I then show some visuals of angels. We discuss the details and texture of the wings, the hair and the clothing. The students can't wait to start their "Angels in Action." I ask: Where will your angel be? What is in the sky with your angel? Is your angel flying up, down or from the side?

Students first use a pencil to draw their picture. Once they have finished, they carefully trace over their drawing using an extra-fine-point permanent marker for the smaller details, and a fine-point marker for the rest of the tracing. Students then use a variety of small and large brushes to paint their picture. …

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