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Wolff at Conference Predicts 'Death of Newspapers' -- Adds It's Not So Bad

Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Wolff at Conference Predicts 'Death of Newspapers' -- Adds It's Not So Bad

Article excerpt

Delivering the Thursday keynote at the annual E&P/Mediaweek Interactive Conference in New Orleans today, Michael Wolff -- Vanity Fair columnist, Murdoch biographer and Newser.com founder -- again predicted the "death of newspapers," adding that he'd been having "fun" pushing the proposition in recent months to the point of being considered a "Dr. Doom."

Newspapers "not only will go away but they should go away," he said, adding that today's talk would "cap" his statements and then he would "never speak of the death of newspapers again."

He said that newspapers going away would not be a bad thing and might even be a great thing, with replacements promising to more than fill the news role and hole. The problem, he admitted, was a financial model.

"So, how to turn this into a business?" he asked. "What is the next step for all of us? The answer is uncertain." But he proposed: "To make it work we need really, really, really large audiences." What he called "television size," maybe 50 million for a few sites.

What he sees coming and needed are giant "networks" -- a few major Internet players, like the TV networks with tens of millions of users.

He repeatedly said that those who worry about the valuable work of newspapers going away are overstating the case, and should look at newspapers with a "cold eye." Few papers, he said, do such work nowadays and can be replaced by networks of bloggers, local or niche experts and journalists. He called a column earlier this week arguing the case for newspapers by The New York Times' David Carr "completely idiotic, fatuous . …

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