Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

New Survey Shows Analysts Remain Committed to Work

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

New Survey Shows Analysts Remain Committed to Work

Article excerpt

CHICAGO -- Psychoanalysis has long been surpassed as the dominant form of psychotherapy, but a new survey suggests that its practitioners remain deeply engaged in the field.

A survey of 138 Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis alumni showed that 15 years after graduation, 86% of respondents were engaged in psychoanalytic teaching, 77% in supervision of students, 53% in study groups, and 96% in professional literature. The percentages did not change dramatically from those reported for the first 5 years after graduation (83%, 81%, 63%, and 96%, respectively).

The analysts had up to 10 current psychoanalytic patients (average 2), and up to 30 years of personal psychoanalysis (average 3.5 years) outside of the analysis required as part of their training.

Analysts with more than two current patients were significantly more likely than those with fewer patients to have a positive view of psychoanalysis as a treatment method and as a theory of the mind, lead author Denise Duval, Ph.D., reported in a poster at the International Psychoanalytical Association 46th Congress. They were also significantly more likely to have a positive view of psychoanalysis as a professional identity and to be less disillusioned with psychoanalysis.

Analysts with more than 3.5 years of personal analysis were also significantly more likely to hold these views.

The 33 female respondents were more likely than the 105 male respondents to hold psychoanalysis as a professional identity (90% vs. 77%) and to report that supervision was an important part of training (78% vs. …

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