Magazine article Guitar Player

Godin: Redline 3

Magazine article Guitar Player

Godin: Redline 3

Article excerpt

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

BECAUSE I LEARNED HOW TO PLAY IN THE AGE OF VAN HALEN, I'VE ALWAYS BEEN A super-Strat guy. Over the years I've owned any number of Strat-shaped shred machines with a humbucker in the bridge and a Floyd Rose. That's why I was psyched to try out the Godin Redline 3. With its dual EMGs, locking whammy, and sweet flame top under a racy trans amber finish, it just looks like it's built for speed, as the name suggests. Picking it up, I could tell that was true, because the Redline 3 has a smooth, satin finished neck and low action that almost insists that you blaze on it. The frets are clean and feel great to bend on, although monster bends on the B string tended to fret out in the upper register. The Redline's body is sculpted in an interesting way. It has a belly carve, which is not uncommon on double cutaway guitars, but the horns are also carved for a slimmer profile. This doesn't affect playability, but it looks cool, although only if you flip the guitar over. I put the Floyd bar in to test the whammy system and discovered that it's a very lively trem. By that I mean that if I accidentally hit it while I'm playing, which I did a few times, it sproings and gargles noticeably. It behaves just fine if I don't hit it, but I had to point the bar at the floor to be safe. The action on the Floyd is smooth as silk, though, with a huge range above and below pitch. The up-trem capabilities are particularly impressive. I can yank the G string up a tritone (!) for Steve Vai-approved Flex-Able-era screams, shrieks, and harmonic abuse. In so doing, I managed to break the G string, and that was the only time the Redline 3 ever went out of tune. Bonus Floyd perk: I was able to change the string in about 15 seconds by unclamping at the nut, unwrapping a couple of the extra winds, and stuffing the same string back into the bridge. Don't try that with a Strat trem! …

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