Magazine article Parks & Recreation

Profile: David Stringer

Magazine article Parks & Recreation

Profile: David Stringer

Article excerpt

At age 15, the entire world changed for NRPA member David Stringer. As a result of a freak diving accident, Stringer went from being an able-bodied teen to a wheelchair-bound paraplegic. The accident would influence Stringer's life--not just his mobility, but his mission.

Today, the human resources director for the Richland County Parks and Recreation Commission in South Carolina, is an outspoken advocate for Paralympics and adaptive sports. In fact, it was as a teen that Stringer worked to help bring to reality the first wheelchair basketball program in Charleston, South Carolina.

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"Participation in adaptive sports and recreation changes the focus from the things that can not be done," says Stringer, "to the things that can be done--and helps those who once felt hopeless due to their disability realize the possibilities of what they can do are endless."

For 32 years, Stringer has worked tirelessly as a participant, coach, and organizer for equal access to sports for all Americans. It was in July of this year that he provided testimony to the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs on the rehabilitation, support, and mentoring of American service members who have returned from Iraq and Afghanistan with traumatic physical and emotional injuries--and the role that public parks and recreation can play in this reintroduction to civilian life. …

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