Magazine article Marketing

Why Is the Last Brand Message Often the Worst?

Magazine article Marketing

Why Is the Last Brand Message Often the Worst?

Article excerpt

Anybody about to commission shop signage, pack instructions or their new users' manual should first stop and think about the new London taxis.

As you will have noticed, the new London taxis have an illuminated sign on top saying TAXI that looks as if it's on even when it's off, so the streets are full of people waving at taxis which are already full of people.

Standing at my bus stop, I wonder obsessively about this. The change must have been a considered one: the new taxis are expensive and thoughtfully designed. Somebody, somewhere - some Hackney Carriage Exterior Design Advisory Committee, perhaps, or even the much-feared Licensing Authority itself - must have decreed that the word TAXI must be clearly visible on the top of the taxi even when the taxi is already taking four Taiwanese to Terminal 3.

This decision can't have been made in the interests of the drivers (drivers don't like the new lights, but say they can do nothing about them); so it must have been taken in the interests of the public. But here we hit a few problems. Nobody looks for full taxis. To the rain-soaked theatre-goer, the only good taxi is an empty taxi. An occupied taxi is far worse than no taxi at all: it provokes rage and envy. To know that a taxi which cannot accommodate you is nonetheless a taxi is of questionable value. And to have your hopes ignited by the sight of that cheerful light, only for it to be doused again as its privileged occupants sweep impassively by, is to be reminded of the causes of the French Revolution. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.