Magazine article Insight on the News

Clinton's Sexual Pathology Is a Genuine Risk to National Security

Magazine article Insight on the News

Clinton's Sexual Pathology Is a Genuine Risk to National Security

Article excerpt

It's one of the most underreported facts found in the Ken Starr report: Bill Clinton warned Monica Lewinsky -- who later obtained a security clearance at the Pentagon -that a foreign government might be monitoring their telephone conversations and that they should concoct a cover story to explain them. Was this "private affair" involving the president and Lewinsky a national-security risk to the United States?

Start reports that, "according to Lewinsky, she and the president had a lengthy conversation that day. He told her that he suspected that a foreign embassy (he did not specify which one) was tapping his telephones, and he proposed cover stories. If ever questioned, she should say that the two were just friends. If anyone ever asked about their phone sex, she should say that they knew their calls were being monitored and the phone sex was just a put-on."

If they were under surveillance, one might think that Starr would have investigated further to determine if Clinton had been blackmailed. If so, how had the president responded to the threat? Had he allowed U.S. foreign policy to be influenced? Lewinsky had talked about her relationship with the president to many of her friends. She allegedly gave White House documents to a high-school teacher with whom she had previously had an affair. It is possible that foreign agents could have learned of the president's risky behavior directly or indirectly from one of her friends.

The danger of damage to our national security was real because the conduct made Clinton a blackmail target. In September 1994, Clinton signed Presidential Decision Directive 29 that established a body known as the Security Policy Board. This entity developed guidelines for determining eligibility for access to classified information. It states that: "Sexual behavior is a security concern if it involves a criminal offense, indicates a personality or emotional disorder, may subject the individual to undue influence or coercion, exploitation, or duress or reflects lack of judgment or discretion."

Another guideline states that a security clearance should be questioned in a case in which a person has engaged in the "concealment of information that increases an individual's vulnerability to coercion, exploitation or duress..." and "activities which, if known, may affect the person's personal, professional or community standing or render the person susceptible to blackmail. …

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