Magazine article Talent Development

Francine Ward: Founder and Director, Esteemable Acts Institute Mill Valley, California

Magazine article Talent Development

Francine Ward: Founder and Director, Esteemable Acts Institute Mill Valley, California

Article excerpt

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Ward has many titles--intellectual property lawyer, breakthrough coach, motivational speaker, and author. Through the self-founded Esteemable Acts Institute, Ward helps clients build self-esteem through positive action. Her books include Esteemable Acts: 10 Actions for Building Real Self-Esteem and 52 Weeks of Esteemable Acts: A Guide to Right Living. She also frequently presents workshops and keynotes on gaining self-esteem, combating fear, handling intellectual property in the Internet age, changing oneself for the better, and acting to fulfill one's goals. Ward supports a number of service organizations, including the ASPCA, the Southern Poverty Law Center, The Innocence Project, the San Francisco Bar Volunteer Legal Services Program, and KIVA. The bulk of her pro bono efforts are with Marin Services for Women, a treatment facility.

Q| WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST JOB, AND WHAT LESSON DID YOU TAKE AWAY FROM IT?

When I was in the 10th grade at the High School of Art & Design in New York City, I talked a lot on the telephone. One day my mom got so tired of me running up the phone bill that she said, "If you're going to talk, you need to get your own phone." So I did. I got a part-time job across the street from my high school at the phone company, and was able to get my very first telephone. Two lessons came from that experience: that nothing was impossible-even though it felt like it in the moment--and if you really want something, you must work for it. That was the bottom line.

Q|WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON ACCOUNTABILITY AND GRATITUDE IN THE WORKPLACE?

It's honestly almost impossible to succeed in life as well as in the workplace without some sense of gratitude and without some sense of accountability.

Accountability is the ability to take responsibility for the part you play in your life-whether or not you like how your life looks. It's important because it's easy to blame someone else for your mistakes. If you're busy pointing the finger outward, you don't notice those three other fingers pointing back at you that would help you improve or change the condition that you don't like. I think a successful worker who could ultimately even become a successful leader has the courage to take responsibility for the things that he's done. …

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