Magazine article Information Today

John Blossom: President, Senior Analyst Shore Communications, Inc

Magazine article Information Today

John Blossom: President, Senior Analyst Shore Communications, Inc

Article excerpt

After a whirlwind of economic adjustments in 2009, enterprise publishers, content technology companies, and their clients, are hoping that the belt-tightening that they have undertaken this year will set the stage for renewed economic health in 2010.

While there are polls and forecasts that seem to bear out these expectations, there are many unknowns that may lead to unpleasant surprises and a challenging environment next year. On the media side, the rapid acceleration of online content consumption and the rapid shift of advertising budgets to online venues spells good news for online revenues, but it also means that sinking traditional print revenues will be less likely to carry online publishing efforts that are not mature enough to manage their futures on their own. Micropayments, subscriptions, and other premium access models will try to help fill the gap, but the success of premium mobile content-serving applications suggests that consumer spending on content may not all go to traditional publishers. At the same time, steps by business and scholarly publishers to leverage social media as a publishing platform will become far more serious and concentrated in 2010, as their clients begin to migrate their time and attention toward social media platforms that increase their productivity and connect them with the markets that they serve and influence.

In enterprise markets, parallel trends are challenging publishers that are seeing librarians with budgets already cut to the quick having to adjust to reshaped enterprise priorities. The other shoe to drop for enterprises will be a continuing reprioritization of collection acquisitions and more emphasis on consortium purchases and project-oriented content acquisition and billing.

At the same time, enterprises are focused more on integrating content from multiple disciplines into services that can drive their revenues from product and service innovations more effectively. Much of the excitement in enterprise publishing will be with content integration and visualization services that aggregate content from multiple sources into decision-making platforms, making advanced search, categorization, and collaboration tools particularly important enterprise investments. It's no longer about just searching in the enterprise: Search is now an editorial and data harvesting tool that feeds sophisticated display and analytics applications. The rapid rise of enterprise-ready cloud computing services underscores the importance of publishers being able to curate a wider array of content to support decision making. …

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