Nothing African about Homosexuality: African Culture Has No Place for Homosexuality as a Way of Life Because It Does Not Fit with the View That Humans Should Reproduce in Order to Be Remembered for Eternity. It Is Time African Governments Told the NGOs and Their European and American Government Sponsors Promoting Homosexuality in Africa to Take a Hike; Let Them Stick to Their Cultural Traditions and Respect Ours! Argues Ifa Kamau Cush

Article excerpt

THE LATE SOUTH AFRICAN SCHOLAR, C. Tsehloane Keto, observed in his book, The Africa-Centered Perspective of History and Social Sciences in the Twenty-First Century, that "the major part of the problem in language use, for history and the social sciences, arises when people who use the language claim universal validity and application for the parochial aspects of its connotation, thereby falsely depicting as universal that which is legitimarely parochial or regional." He was referring to the use of language by European imperial powers to rationalise their hegemonic control of Africa's political and economic space.

Similarly, Western-controlled NGOs, along with their African shills, have, over the years, imposed their interpretation of homosexual relations as a natural expression of same-sex love on African countries, forcing many African governments, notably South Africa, to pivot away from what Keto called Africa's "epistemological centre" which eschews homosexuality, and, instead, adopt a paradigm that encourages such behaviour.

Homosexual acts contradict the very core of fundamental African beliefs in the sanctity of the perpetuation of the African family; beliefs that have been the bedrock of African culture and spirituality for thousands of years.

In the millennia preceding Christianity and Islam, African myths, rituals, art, language and works of wisdom celebrated the complementary relationship between the male and the female, according to the eight-volume UNESCO publication, General History of Africa. The ancient Africans of Egypt, dating back to 3200 BCE (Before the Common Era), complemented their supreme deity Amon-Ra with a consort goddess, Mut. And, down the millennia, the Yoruba people complemented their god of thunder and lightning Sango with his favourite wife, Oya, the goddess of the wind.

Dr Molefi Kete Asante, professor at Temple University, USA, and co-editor with Dr Ama Mazama of the seminal work, The Encyclopedia of African Religion, believes that the homosexual discussion in Africa is driven by "Western interests, not African interests". He alludes to what Dr Keto referred to as a Europe-centred perspective that is allegedly a necessary conceptual base arrogantly insinuated into African social discourse.

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According to Dr Asante, "the overall African philosophy is that life and the reproduction of life sit at the core of human society. Men and women have children who ritualise their parents and ancestors. In the process of building community, African culture has no place, no category and no concept that can accommodate homosexuality as a way of life because it does not fit with the view that humans should reproduce in order to be remembered for eternity. …

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