Magazine article Marketing

Expert Comment: Kellogg

Magazine article Marketing

Expert Comment: Kellogg

Article excerpt

The health debate is at the top of the political agenda; it commands countless column inches and regularly sparks debate around kitchen tables across Britain.

Too often, however, it is dominated by soundbites that, although they make good reading, are not the hard nutritional facts.

Contrary to what you might read in the papers, breakfast cereals make a positive contribution to the nation's diet. They also play a central role in our getting enough fibre, vitamins and minerals in our diets. For instance, cereals account for up to 29% of our children's iron intake; children also get half their milk intake when eating cereals.

We also need to remember that, on any day, one in five children skips breakfast; they prefer to spend pounds 646m a year on a 'sweetshop breakfast', unlikely to be nutrient-rich. That's why it is vital to create cereals kids want to eat and that's what we do.

Research also shows that people who eat cereal are typically lower in weight than those who do not, a highly relevant factor given the current obesity debate. …

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