Magazine article Nutrition Action Healthletter

Iron & Cancer

Magazine article Nutrition Action Healthletter

Iron & Cancer

Article excerpt

Do lower levels of iron in the body mean less cancer? Iron can damage tissues by creating free radicals, but previous studies that looked at iron and cancer risk were inconsistent.

To answer the question, researchers randomly assigned 1,300 middle-aged men with peripheral artery disease to one of two groups. (Arteries going to their arms, legs, kidneys, or stomach were clogged.)

The "iron-reduction" group donated blood every six months for an average of four years, while the "control" group didn't donate. (The study was designed to see if reducing iron levels could lower the risk of heart attacks and stroke, which it didn't.)

During the study, cancers (lung, prostate, colon, and others) were diagnosed in 60 men in the control group, but in only 38 in the iron-reduction group. And among participants who were diagnosed with cancer, those in the iron-reduction group were only half as likely to die.

And regardless of which group the men were in, those who were diagnosed with cancer had higher iron levels in their blood than those who weren't diagnosed with cancer. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.