Magazine article Newsweek

War and Remembrance

Magazine article Newsweek

War and Remembrance

Article excerpt

Byline: Jon Meacham

When I was growing up, I was semi-addicted to the novels of Herman Wouk, particularly The Winds of War and War and Remembrance. They did not glamorize warfare, but they did humanize it. For the generations who came of age long after World War II, books such as Wouk's gave words such as Auschwitz and Midway and Leyte all the more meaning, for readers experienced them through the lives (and deaths) of the novelist's characters. In the closing pages of his epic, Wouk mused on the tragedy of history, and on its redemptive possibilities. "The beginning of the end of War," he said, "lies in Remembrance."

Americans are not very good at remembering. Our endless capacity to focus on the future rather than the past is one of our great national virtues--and one of our great national vices. Though we hardly seem to note it, even in passing, we remain a country at war, with 86,000 troops in Afghanistan and 96,000 more in Iraq. …

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