Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Perspective

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Perspective

Article excerpt

Psychiatrists have long been aware of the strong association between depression and diabetes, as a large number of the patients we treat for depression also seem to have diabetes. Although it is difficult for us to know whether their morbidity from diabetes is secondary to their depression and lack of motivation to engage in quality self-care or if somehow their diabetes is contributing to their depression (or a combination of both), it behooves physicians to take care of the entire patient.

Unfortunately, the disconnect between mental and physical health is a deep-seated problem dating back to the 17th century, when Rene Descartes wrote about mind-body dualism. Further, the lack of respect given to psychiatry in medical schools does not help physicians who practice physical medicine develop respect for the relationship between the mind and the body or the field of psychiatry in general. Without that fundamental respect, it is nearly impossible to provide holistic medical care to the entire patient, because doing so requires interdisciplinary teamwork.

As the evidence base linking depression and diabetes continues to expand, and as research continues to show that treating depression in patients with diabetes greatly improves their mental and physical health outcomes, the failure of general medical practitioners to consider their diabetic patients' depressive disorders will be a liability risk, and it will become ever more clear that not addressing the comorbid depression is unethical. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.