Magazine article Talent Development

The Battle of Falling Engagement: The Latest Engagement Numbers Indicate an Uphill Struggle for Recapturing the Hearts and Minds of U.S. Employees

Magazine article Talent Development

The Battle of Falling Engagement: The Latest Engagement Numbers Indicate an Uphill Struggle for Recapturing the Hearts and Minds of U.S. Employees

Article excerpt

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Although the economy has begun to improve, company loyalty has declined significantly and employees are feeling less engaged than anticipated, according to a national study on employee engagement in the U.S. workforce.

Modern Survey, a Minneapolis-based survey provider, polled 1,000 U.S. working adults to gauge the extent to which employees take pride in their company, believe they have a promising future there, recommend their company as a great place to work, go "above and beyond" their normal job duties to help their organization succeed, and intend to stay.

One might expect that at the dawn of an economic rebound, U.S. workers would become increasingly optimistic about job prospects within their organizations; however, this study found the opposite to be true. Employee engagement actually increased sharply between August 2008 and August 2009 as the economy bottomed out. When asked if they intended to stay with their company in August of 2009, 63 percent of employees responded with a "yes," but when asked the same question in February of 2010, only 57 percent of respondents answered affirmatively--a statistically significant decrease of 6 percentage points.

Similarly, the percentage of U.S. workers who took pride in their company dropped from 79 percent in 2009 to 73 percent in 2010. Furthermore, fewer employees saw a promising future with their company, down 3 percentage points to 52 percent in 2010.

In 2009, as the U.S. economic recession deepened, and job losses grew steadily, most organizations found that it was necessary to ask their employees to do more with less. Job loads increased as support and available resources decreased. Beleaguered workers who survived the onslaught of layoffs and pay cuts were thankful to have just kept their jobs.

According to Don MacPherson, president of Modern Survey, "the increase in employee engagement levels from August 2008 to August 2009 came from a willingness to do more in the face of adversity, followed by employees feeling hopeful that they had survived the worst of the recession. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.