Magazine article National Catholic Reporter

Gratitude for NCR's Friends

Magazine article National Catholic Reporter

Gratitude for NCR's Friends

Article excerpt

October is the month we begin our annual Friends of NCR campaign, an effort vital to the well-being of the NCR mission. This is because subscriptions to the paper in addition to advertising revenues make up roughly 80 percent of company revenues. The rest comes from Friends of NCR. Meanwhile, the person who heads up our annual campaign, that voice on the other end of the telephone, that woman on the other end of the NCR Friends correspondence, is development director Connie Stucki, now in her sixth year with our company. I asked her recently how she would characterize those who give to the campaign. She responded: "Our donors are extremely loyal to NCR; they are extremely supportive." Said Stucki: "Most would give us a million dollars' if they had it." Alas, most don't have that kind of money. In fact, many NCR readers live on limited income, making our gratitude all the greater. Many of you tell us that NCR is your "lifeline to the church." Others say that without NCR you would feel isolated. Such testimonials can be humbling. We make every effort to be wise custodians of your contributions. Please respond to the letter we sent you--and know that if you do, you will help make Connie Stucki's day.

Readers should be grateful to Jesuit Fr. Raymond Schroth for returning Jesuit Fr. Robert Drinan to NCR's pages (book review, Page 1). The congressman from Massachusetts, and subsequent NCR columnist, was a staunch NCR supporter, as well as an esteemed colleague. We have missed his moral musings since his death in January 2007. I had the opportunity to accompany Drinan and Congressman John Conyers to Vietnam in 1969 not long after I completed serving two years there with the nonprofit International Voluntary Services. We spent 10 days checking out the impact of the war on ordinary Vietnamese. One day we flew in a small plane to Con Son Island off the coast of Vietnam, where we encountered thousands of political prisoners, including some elderly men who had been held since the mid-1950s. …

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