Magazine article Guitar Player

Name the Guitar Hero! Nuggets from the Guitar Player Archives

Magazine article Guitar Player

Name the Guitar Hero! Nuggets from the Guitar Player Archives

Article excerpt

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

How do you approach solos?

The first guy that I met--my idol in England--was Mick Green, who used to play with Johnny Kidd and the Pirates. He was the first big note-bender, particularly on the G string. And you'd freak over Jimmy Burton, and you'd freak over Mickey Green, and you'd wonder how they got that sound. So I got to see Mickey play, and I went backstage to see him, and I asked if I could play his guitar. He said, "Sure, man." I picked it up, and he has strings like bloody piano strings--they're huge! And the G string isn't plain--it's wound, and he used to stretch it practically to the A string and beyond. Big hands, and he would pull it down and tuck it under, as well. That's what really buzzed me out--using the heavy strings--because a lot of younger guitarists tend to get light strings, and they quickly get into bending riffs, and all those Jeff Beck trips. But it's like the string, the fretboard, and the pickup are doing the work, and you're just piddling about. When Freddie King--who is my man at the moment--does a bend, he's pulling it a good inch to get that sound, and he works for it. If you're going to hit a note, you've got to work for it.

As for solos, I was happiest listening to Jimi Hendrix--that was like heaven. For me, it was probably a good thing he died, because it made me realize that I wasn't going to be at any more Jimi Hendrix concerts, and that I was going to have to try and do it for myself again. …

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