Magazine article Information Outlook

Transitioning Up or Out: Keeping Your Skills Current and Learning from Others Can Position You to Take Advantage of Opportunities in Management or Start Your Own Business

Magazine article Information Outlook

Transitioning Up or Out: Keeping Your Skills Current and Learning from Others Can Position You to Take Advantage of Opportunities in Management or Start Your Own Business

Article excerpt

Avery wise library school professor told me that you never know where your career may take you, and developing the skills and strategies needed to move up (or out) can only expand your opportunities. This advice is especially true in today's challenging economy. The more skills and abilities you master and successfully integrate into your work life, the better your chance of enhancing and advancing your own interests as well as those of your library or information center.

Even if you don't think you want to join the upper ranks of management or become your own boss as a consultant, the skills and strategies needed to be successful in these endeavors are invaluable in making you a better and more effective information professional, both at your current job and in any future position you may want to pursue. I hope the articles that follow will instill in you the confidence to pursue these skills and strategies and help you improve the status and importance of knowledge services in your organization.

Two of the articles are first-person profiles by info pros who "left the library behind" and found personal and professional satisfaction in new careers. Jane John is a former corporate librarian who started her own company, On Point Research, after her family moved to Maine. In her article, Jane describes how her training and experience as a librarian prepared her (or didn't, in some instances) for consulting work and how she repackaged and repositioned herself to become a consultant.

Anne Caputo, SLA's current president, never worked in a physical library--her first job in the information field was at Lockheed Martin, as a customer service trainer for the Dialog database--but her degree in library science and her knowledge of how librarians think and work helped elevate her to the highest levels at Dialog and at Dow Jones, where she now serves as executive director of learning and information professional programs. …

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