Magazine article Alternatives Journal

Is It a Revolution?

Magazine article Alternatives Journal

Is It a Revolution?

Article excerpt

IN 2009, the CBC ran a series called The Great Food Revolution. If you doubt that something as simple as what we choose to put in our mouths can have a revolutionary effect, listen to episode four: "Food of the Future." In it, the CBC notes, "How we cook, what we eat, the decisions we make will come from chefs, teachers, activists, scientists, and farmers." Not, please note, from government, agribusiness and the organizations that represent them. The power in food and agriculture lies with the people.

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The response we received to our call for articles for this food issue backs up the CBC's message. We were overwhelmed with inspiring, thoughtful and sometimes revolutionary ideas about the future of our food system. People, as the great ideas put forward in "Revolutionary Fodder" illustrate, are more aware than ever that food is about more than calories, health and corporate profits. It involves our economic, social, environmental and spiritual lives.

Community food security--what is sometimes translated as food sovereignty - is drawing rural folks and farmers together with urbanites, environmentalists and those involved in public health and social justice. Such powerful new alliances are being replicated globally. In "Sovereignty Now!," Annette Desmarais and her colleagues describe a global movement that is intent on putting food back into the hands of the people who grow and eat it. Canada's complementary effort, as Margaret Webb, author of the 2008 book Apples to Oysters describes, is an initiative called the People's Food Policy Project (PFPP). …

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