Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Citizen Journalism Tribal: From Elephants Trampling through Property to Government Swindlers, Any News Is Good News When You've Never Had It Before

Magazine article Editor & Publisher

Citizen Journalism Tribal: From Elephants Trampling through Property to Government Swindlers, Any News Is Good News When You've Never Had It Before

Article excerpt

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

INDIA IS FAST BECOMING THE hot spot for news growth, so hot that even in an impoverished and illiterate area of the country, a communications trend that's part Twitter, part "telephone game" is quickly catching on.

Developed by Shubhranshu Choudhary, a Knight International Journalism Fellow and freelance producer for the BBC, this audio-based citizen journalism service allows residents of a tribal community in Chhattisgarh, India, to produce and share audio news reports simply by calling a number on any fixed or cell phone. Residents can listen to reports on important issues, such as school closures, evictions, elephant tramplings, and police and government abuses. Users respond to voice prompts, so they can access the reports even if they cannot read.

Citizens also can call in their own news. Three professional journalists act as moderators and verify (or admit they can't verify) the news that is called in, then edit, and publish it.

Called CGNet Swara, it is believed to be the first source of news in the state, a primarily poor, rural area in central India. It is especially useful because the 80million-strong Adivasi tribal community has limited access to computers and electricity, and India bans all radio news except the government-run station. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.