Magazine article Information Management

France Enacts Tough Retention Law

Magazine article Information Management

France Enacts Tough Retention Law

Article excerpt

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

France has implemented a tough new data retention law--so tough that many Internet service providers (ISPs) and hosting providers are already vowing to challenge it in court.

The Law on Trust in the Digital Economy (LCEN), originally announced in June 2004, was recently published in France's Official Journal. It states that providers must retain the following data for one year after the creation, modification, or deletion of online content:

* The identifier of the connection to the origin of the communication

* The identifier assigned by the system information content, in the transaction

* The types of protocols used to connect to the service and the transfer of content

* The nature of the transaction (e.g., writing an e-mail and downloading an image)

* The date and time of the transaction

* The identifier used by the author of the operation when it supplied it

In addition, the decree says hosts will retain the following data for one year after an account is deleted:

* The identifier of the connection (when the account is created)

* The full name or business name and any pseudonyms used

* The mailing addresses associated

* The e-mail addresses or accounts involved

* Telephone numbers

* The passwords and information needed to verify or change the passwords

If the service requires a subscription fee, the law requires hosting providers and ISPs to retain the type of payment, the reference of payment, amount paid, and the date and time of the transaction. …

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