Magazine article New Zealand Management

NZIM: Stepping Up! Game Goes Global; the New Zealand Institute of Management Wants New Zealand Managers to Compete in a Pan-Asian Management Game. the Move Is a Step in NZIM's Strategy to Build Stronger Relationships with Asian Managers. NZIM Northern Chief Executive Kevin Gaunt Explains

Magazine article New Zealand Management

NZIM: Stepping Up! Game Goes Global; the New Zealand Institute of Management Wants New Zealand Managers to Compete in a Pan-Asian Management Game. the Move Is a Step in NZIM's Strategy to Build Stronger Relationships with Asian Managers. NZIM Northern Chief Executive Kevin Gaunt Explains

Article excerpt

NZIM believes in the effectiveness of tried and tested management games. It has promoted the NZIM Leadership Challenge for the past five years. But it is time to step up a notch. Our best managers need to compete globally.

This year we are looking for two New Zealand teams to compete in the Asian Management Game (AMG) which is promoted every year by the Asian Association of Management Organisations (AAMO). The game has been running for almost 20 years.

The AMG provides a platform for young executives to learn and exchange management experiences. But it also serves to connect different management organisations in the Asia Pacific region.

The software underpinning the game was designed and developed by professors of the Operational Research Department of the University of Strathclyde in Scotland. It is constantly enhanced to make the game relevant and challenging and to meet participating companies' current needs and keep up with leading-edge management technology. The simulator creates a close-to-reality business environment for AMG participants to test their management knowledge and team strength.

We think it is increasingly important that New Zealand managers understand more than just local business and management practice. As I said in this column in June, our managers need to have more and deeper conversations with their Asian counterparts. NZIM sees participation in this game as one, albeit small, step in the right direction. We must help build relationships through AAMO that will encourage more effective management conversations and learning experiences.

Two Kiwi teams

New Zealand has been invited to enter two teams in the game. The winning team will be sponsored a free trip to Macau and join with young managers from other AAMO countries for a study visit in China's Pearl River Delta. The final round will be at the end of October.

Each team consists of three to five members. Groups of seven or eight teams are determined by draw. Each round requires five financial quarters of decisions. The team that achieves the highest share price wins. Only eight teams qualify for the final competition.

The game is played on the internet. Decisions on marketing, finance, production and human resources are entered online according to the game calendar schedule. Teams receive a management report at the end of each financial quarter detailing the latest economic consequences and company's performance after their decisions.

The process involves analysing a company history, strategic planning, making decisions in a competitive and constantly changing environment and analysing results and change management strategies. A team's strategy is implemented through 66 decisions, ranging from product delivery to competitor and market intelligence.

The deadline for registration this year is August 31. Companies wanting to enter teams should contact their local NZIM office. Contact details are on the NZIM panel on this page.

Games like this help develop management capability. Young and aspiring managers particularly, benefit from being placed in situations that are outside the boundaries of their normal job activity. As Confucius reportedly said: "I hear and I forget; I see and I remember; I do and I understand."

Real life management

Game participants are placed in environments that reflect real life management, leadership and decision-making. …

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