Magazine article The New American

The Second Set of Books: "Administrative Law" Is Law That Is Created by Bureaucracies to Enforce Their Own Rules. Federally, Such Law Is as Unconstitutional as It Is Oppressive-And It's All-Encompassing

Magazine article The New American

The Second Set of Books: "Administrative Law" Is Law That Is Created by Bureaucracies to Enforce Their Own Rules. Federally, Such Law Is as Unconstitutional as It Is Oppressive-And It's All-Encompassing

Article excerpt

At 5:30 p.m. on a Wednesday in June, Thomas James Ball of Holden, Massachusetts, drenched himself with gasoline and struck a match. He burned to death at the door of the courthouse in Keene, New Hampshire.

"I saw a man standing on fire," one eyewitness told WMUR-Channel 9. "He walked around a little bit, walked on to the grass, collapsed on all fours and literally sat there and burned."

"Several men said their attempts to help Ball proved ineffective," WMUR continued, "partly because it appeared he did not want to be helped. 'He just looked like he was just chilling there, doing yoga or something. It was weird. We were all stunned,' said witness Sean Desio."

By air-time that evening, "Investigators [had] not released any possible motive" for this very public, agonizing, and dramatic suicide. But Ball himself solved the mystery the next day, when his last words--all 15 carefully investigated, cogently argued pages of them--reached Keene's Sentinel.

At 58, this loving father of three children immolated himself because the state had systematically and mercilessly destroyed his family. "My story starts with the infamous slapping incident of April 2001," he recalls in his manifesto. "While putting my four year old daughter to bed, she began licking my hand. After giving her three verbal warnings I slapped her [still a legal punishment, he explains later]. She got a cut lip. My wife asked me to leave to calm things down. When I returned hours later, my wife said the police were by and said I could not stay there that night. The next day the police came by my work and arrested me, booked me, and then returned me to work."

The couple divorced about six months later. That gave the State even more power than it already boasted to ration this "domestic abuser's" time with his children.

For the next decade, Ball would suffer a series of court dates, mandatory counseling, and officious meddling, always with the threat that if he didn't cooperate, bureaucrats would strip him of his natural rights as a parent. He saw--and chronicles for us--the corruption, ineptitude, and unconstitutionality of "child protective services" up close. He also substantiates his observations with fascinating and original research.

Ball's horrific suicide condemns this satanic scam; indeed, he symbolically chose his deathbed based on his family's persecution: "I only managed to get the main door of the Cheshire County Courthouse. ... I would appreciate it if some of you boys would finish the job for me. They harmed my children. The place is evil. So take it out." He has become both a legend and a martyr for "fathers' rights," a movement he joined and eventually led.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The Second Set of Books

But Ball's protest against the State and its war on his family has far wider implications, and not just for other parents enduring the same atrocities. It damns the entire regime of administrative law--or, in Ball's words, "The Second Set of Books."

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"You never cover the Second Set of Books your junior year in high school," he writes. "That [is] because we are not suppose to have a Second Set of Books. This is America--we have the rule of law," he adds with fine sarcasm. "The people within the law enforcement community no longer seem to know the difference between the law, with its checks and balances, and the policies, procedure and protocols that constitute The Second Set of Books."

Like Ball before the State eviscerated his family, you've probably never heard of the Second Set of Books. You may naively believe that the politicians in the judicial, legislative, and executive branches govern according to the Constitution--or at least are supposed to.

You would be wrong. Since the late 19th century, administrative law has ruled most of American life. And that Second Set of Books is openly, consciously inimical to the Constitution. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.