Magazine article ADWEEK

Trash Talkers: Alec Baldwin and John Krasinski Trade Insults in New Era's Episodic Slugfest Celebrating the Yankees-Red Sox Rivalry

Magazine article ADWEEK

Trash Talkers: Alec Baldwin and John Krasinski Trade Insults in New Era's Episodic Slugfest Celebrating the Yankees-Red Sox Rivalry

Article excerpt

Specs

Client New Era

Agency The Brooklyn Brothers, New York

Director Bryan Buckley, Hungry Man

Editing Big Sky Edit (See the spot and full credits at Adweek.com)

Genesis After airing a single ad with Evan Longoria Last year, New Era caps wanted something more episodic that would stay fresh over the Long 2011 baseball season. When a plan to use Charlie Sheen imploded, ad agency The Brooklyn Brothers suggested a series about the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox rivalry. New 60-second ads would coincide with each of the six scheduled series between the clubs. "The thought was to find two uberfans to represent the rivalry and have them go at it throughout the season," says agency co-founder Guy Barnett. Red Sox fan John Krasinski agreed to take part, and he brought in Alec Baldwin, a Yankee fan. The agency signed an all-star director, too, in Super Bowl and celebrity-ad veteran Bryan Buckley (himself a die-hard Red Sox supporter).

Copywriting The agency drafted scripts, but Krasinski started from scratch with current and former Office writers Charlie Grandy and Mike Schur. "John sort of knows advertising, so he's Like, 'I want to do something Like the Larry Bird-Michael Jordan ads,'" says Buckley. "I'm Like, 'Wow, that's old school How do you even remember that?'" Krasinski delivered rewrites within a week. As Hollywood writers and friends of the actors, Grandy and Schur were able to dial up the scripted insults "in ways that perhaps advertising people can't, or wouldn't dream or dare to," says Barnett. The series opens with Krasinski and Baldwin trash talking over the phone, and then escalates to various pranks and even a thrown punch. In the final commercial breaking this Friday, the pair is forced to watch baseball together at Krasinski's place, as Baldwin has burned his own house down while Lighting Sox tickets on fire.

Art direction Buckley shot in black and white, because that's the essence of the rivalry--no gray areas, it was also a different Look from the actors' sitcoms and fresh for the category. …

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