Magazine article Art Monthly

Hans-Peter Feldmann: Shadow Play

Magazine article Art Monthly

Hans-Peter Feldmann: Shadow Play

Article excerpt

Hans-Peter Feldmann: Shadow Play

Belfast Exposed 22 October to 20 December

Hans-Peter Feldmann's Shadow Play was originally shown in 'Fare Mundi' curated by Daniel Birnbaum at the Venice Biennale in 2009. The work captures a sense of the artist's practice dating back to the late 1960s, a practice which combines found photographs, including imagery from advertising and amateur snaps, magazines and private albums. Feldmann has been labelled a collector, a treasure hunter, an avid hoarder; he has an archivist's greed for imagery and is engaged in an archaeological pursuit of the everyday object.

Feldmann's exhibition at the Belfast Exposed gallery consists of this single work. The gallery is painted dark grey apart from one wall, which is white. Between the viewer and the white wall is a barrier of approximately 20ft of wallpaper-pasting trestle tables mounted with a sequence of intensively handmade lights constructed from coffee and biscuit tins--which we are warned 'get very hot'--with the wiring and sockets on display. The spotlights illuminate nine square wooden platforms. Each platform, approximately a foot apart, bears nine found/handmade objects, toys, souvenirs and ornaments, including: a Pez sweet dispenser, a nodding rottweiler, Snoopy, a gun, the Eiffel tower, open shears, a Tyrannosaurus Rex, a weather vane, Cindy, Goofy, cupids and fairies. Each object sits on an individual mount and some are placed on top of small wooden poles, a nod to the shadow puppet tradition that dates back some 2,000 years to the Han Dynasty. Each platform rotates and is set up with a shared set of formal characteristics: a central object surrounded by a set of eight smaller objects. There is a thoughtful and considered repetition of objects that creates relationships and acts to build narratives between the separate platforms.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

In between these carefully arranged platforms, the remainder of the table is a mess, strewn with detritus: plastic bottles, work gloves, bits of roughly broken wood--the bits which weren't used to elevate the coffee-tin lamps--staple guns, Stanley knives, masking tape, pliers, a hammer, all left by the installation team. The incongruous nature of the detritus creates a tension; it is as if the exhibition hasn't opened yet or that there wasn't enough time to clear up--we have been invited to view a work in progress. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.