Magazine article Arts & Activities

Editor's Note

Magazine article Arts & Activities

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

Prints are powerful. From the beauty and detail of Utagawa Hiroshige's "The Waterfall River at Oji," to the charming houses on page 29, prints have the power to teach history and connect language arts with visual art. In this issue, we share ideas, techniques and motivations so you, too, will experience the power of printmaking in your classroom.

"Learning from Exhibitions, The Floating World: Ukiyo-e Prints from The Lauren Rogers Museum of Art" (page 15) is sure to provide ample motivation to get started. Seven prints by Japanese masters are featured, including three by Hiroshige, along with information about the time in Japan when this important art form flourished, and ignited the imagination of Western artists Vincent van Gogh, Mary Cassatt, Paul Gauguin and many others. These prints will ignite your students' interest, too.

Another famous Japanese printmaker provided inspiration for Tracy Fortune's "36 Views of Mount Rainier" (page 24). Writes Tracy, "I look for ways to take students on virtual journeys to faraway places, and then connect the experience to something they can relate to on a more personal level. One of my favorite avenues ... is through a ... unit inspired by ... Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849), and his series of art prints, 'Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji.'" So, how does Tracy make it personal for her middle-school students? She substitutes their area's own iconic peak--Mount Ranier--for Mount Fuji!

Youngsters learn how artists share experiences and communicate ideas through their work in "Integrating the Curriculum, Our Little Houses: From Folly Cove to Lake Elsinore" (page 28). …

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