Magazine article Marketing to Women: Addressing Women and Women's Sensibilities

Differences in Beauty and Self Image between Teen Girls and Women in Their 60s

Magazine article Marketing to Women: Addressing Women and Women's Sensibilities

Differences in Beauty and Self Image between Teen Girls and Women in Their 60s

Article excerpt

Although the majority of women in their teens (80%) and 60s (88%) feel they look good for their age, according to Oprah magazine, they also express conflicting emotions about their self-image, which can make it difficult for advertisers to be sure they're striking the right tone in campaigns.

More than six in 10 women in their 60s (62%) and 57% of teen girls say they have a healthy body image. However, only 43% of teen girls and 38% of women in their 60s are happy with their bodies.

While 69% of teen girls say they like their appearance, 50% say they are self-conscious about it. Although older women are slightly less likely than teen girls to be happy about their looks (64% vs. 69%), they are more likely than teens to describe their looks in favorable terms, such as being grateful (52%) and satisfied (46%).

One certainty is that teen girls fret over beauty issues that teen girls from earlier generations did not. Despite the fact that teen girls are unlikely to actually have wrinkles, more than four in 10 teen girls (43%) are concerned about aging, and 46% have considered plastic surgery (only 5% have actually undergone procedures).

Nearly seven in 10 women overall (69%) feel the earlier one starts using age prevention remedies, the better, according to market research firm Mintel. Women are most concerned about signs of aging on their entire face (48%), followed by the eye area (41%), stomach (40%), and neck (31%). Nevertheless, most women (69%) believe how one ages is mostly genetic.

While 58% of women applaud the UK's decision to ban beauty ads that use photos altered with Photoshop, 59% of teen girls and 9% of women in their 60s have used photo-altering software to change a photograph of themselves, according to the Oprah survey. …

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