Magazine article The Fader

The Greene Years: Jessamyn Fiore's New Book Revisits a Pioneering Art Space

Magazine article The Fader

The Greene Years: Jessamyn Fiore's New Book Revisits a Pioneering Art Space

Article excerpt

* The artists that emerged from New York's avant-garde scene in the 1970s often talk about SoHo before it was SoHo: a burned-out low rent district with ample loft space to house like minds. In addition to living, playing and performing in these spaces, this neighborhood was also a breeding ground for new forms of exhibition spaces, 112 Greene Street being among the most progressive. In a new book, 112 Greene St, published by Radius Books in conjunction with the gallery show 112 Greene Street: The Early Years (7970-1974), which exhibited at David Zwirner last year, curator Jessamyn Fiore presents a compilation of interviews conducted between June 2010 and January 2011 with 19 artists, performers, organizers, writers and friends who were involved with the space. Fiore explains in her foreword:

  Opened in October 19 by Jeffrey Lew (with Alan Saret
  and Gordon Matta-Clark), 112 Greene Street became the
  first sizeable, independent art space in New York that
  resisted calling itself a "gallery." A place for
  artists to both create and exhibit works, it was
  self-curated, and during its early years, did not
  have a formalized committee for determining exhibition
  schedules, sales strategies, and fundraising.
  Celebrating organic and sometimes anarchic qualities,
  Lew ran the space with his friends--as an artist, for
  artists--never refusing anyone the freedom to dig a
  hole in the basement or cut into the walls.112 Greene
  Street became the center of the community. … 
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